This Unruly: a repository of video cut-ups

The rule-set video remix subcategory describes clips, which have been created through the use of an organising rule-set. Supercuts, where repeating actions/dialogue etc. have been stacked together (often in alphanumeric list-form) are obvious examples.
Rule-sets are usually produced quite mechanically, where the author might be motivated to turn a film into game (for comedic effect) or perhaps as a critical act, using repeating actions to foreground (and generally distort or parody) those being represented. This is further enabled by the easy replicability and recognisability of the form.
For viewers, interest relates to their sense of being complicit with the author in their awareness of the 'joke'.

Creator: Ava DuVernay (2016). Trump's Good Old Days (excerpt from the documentary 13th).

Creator: Anonymous [consumer]. (2016). Mike Pence is obsessed with Donald Trump's (broad) shoulders.

This clip presents an alternative view of US Vice President Mike Pence. As an ultra social-conservative Pence is vehemently against gay rights. By stacking multiple comments about Donald Trump's appearance i.e. his broad shoulders the clip foregrounds a possible homoerotic subtext to his comments (and therefore raises the prospect of a significant epistemological contradiction).
It's worth noting that this is a familiar angle used by social-progressives to bring conservatives into disrepute. The critique generally functions by parodying the perceived earnestness of the subject. The clip also builds on the perceived subservience of Pence to Trump i.e. to use popular vernacular, the clip strongly implies that Pence is Trump's 'bitch'. (Perkins. S, 2017)

Creator: Anonymous [Quartz]. (2016). The MILLENNIAL WHOOP is taking over pop music.

Creator: Anonymous [Cyranek]. (2016). really really really really really really.

Creator: Anonymous [Downhill]. (2016). Morgan and Morgan 3.0.

This is an example of détournement publicitaire (advertising hijack) - where the cut-up producer has repurposed an existing television commercial to communicate an alternative message to that originally intended.
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